Running is an activity that involves repetitive stress and impact, sometimes for a long

duration, people who have an underlying lower back problem can find running or jogging

makes their pain worse or leads to additional types of pain, when running or jogging leads to

more or additional back pain such as sciatica (leg pain or weakness) it is important to know

when to seek treatment and what types of treatment to expect, at TMS Well Being we can

help identify that underlying issue and treat as required.

Tight Glutes

The Gluteal Muscles comprise of three muscles which make up the buttocks: Gluteus

Maximus, Gluteus Medius and the Gluteus Minimus. An inhibited muscle means that the

muscle is not firing properly and a weak muscle indicates the muscle is firing normally, at

TMS Well Being we can perform a prone hip extension test and also help identify any

underlying issues causing the tightness in the Glutes and treat accordingly.

Tight Calves

Calf tightness from running is a common problem we treat at TMS well Being, for some

people, the calf muscles simply feel a bit tight the day after a long or hard run, for others, the

tension affects them when running and can be so severe that the aching pain causes them to

stop, Deep Tissue Massage is a treatment we use on tight calves on a daily basis and

generally this will help the runner going forward.

Tight Hamstrings

When runners are feeling tightness in the Hamstrings there can be a variety of reasons and a

lot of the time at TMS well Being we identify the issue is generally coming from the lower

back or pelvis region, we can usually identify the underlying issue and will treat as required,

which will help avoid the possibility of a Hamstring strain in the long term.

IT (Iliotibial Band) Syndrome

Iliotibial band syndrome is an overuse injury of the tissues located on the outer part of thigh

and knee, it can causes pain and tenderness in those areas, especially just above the knee

Iliotibial band syndrome is more common in runners and cyclists. The Iliotibial band is a

thick band of tissue that begins at the iliac crest in the pelvis, runs down the outer part of the

thigh, and crosses the knee to attach into the top part of the tibia or shinbone and helps

stabilize the outside part of the knee through its range of motion.